Drifting Around Our Frozen Lakes: Snow Shoeing in the Vortex

vortex3RLC-2Say what you will about the never ending Polar Vortex winter of 2013-2014 but you have admit it’s not boring. Two weeks or so ago I wrote about the unique post Winter Loppet conditions on our chain of lakes (Calhoun, Cedar Lake, and Lake of the Isles).  At that time the Vortex had produced solid conditions that made exploring the lakes extremely easy, but I warned it might not last. Guess what, those days are gone.

Our latest nine to ten inch snow storm obliterated all the trails and even the groomed cross country ski trails. Many of the Loppet’s ice sculptures still survive but the sidewalk –like conditions on the lake have been replaced by beautiful (sometimes deep) snow drifts.  The best way to explore the lake now is with snow shoes or cross country skis.

The best thing about this time of year is that the sun is always low enough on the horizon that any time of day the angle of light yields interesting shadows. The best part is that the shadows shift with the sun so the same landscape will look different depending on what time of day you visit.

I strapped on my snow shoes and went for a stroll with my camera. If you do the same don’t forget to bring a walking stick or poles. I forgot mine and got careless and distracted and… you guessed it, I went down. If you’ve ever fallen into deep snow while wearing snow shoes you know hard it is to get back up. With those shoes on you can’t just snap your feet back under you and pop up. I also discovered that there’s a layer of extremely wet mush about 16 inches under that snow.  Furthermore I discovered that when you’re gloves totally saturated with water (when you fall you put your hands out in front of you) in these temperatures they start to freeze solid. Who knew? 

You can see more photos on my Facebook Photography page

vortex3R-1

People have built little snow men and families all over the lakes

People have built little snow men and families all over the lakes

Canoes waiting for the thaw on Lake Calhoun

Canoes waiting for the thaw on Lake Calhoun

vortex3R-13

The Lagoon between Lake of the Isles and Calhoun.

The Lagoon between Lake of the Isles and Calhoun.

The snow drifts on the lakes are like waves frozen in time

The snow drifts on the lakes are like waves frozen in time

Easter Island on Lake of the Isles. One of the surviving Winter Loppet ice sculptures

Easter Island on Lake of the Isles. One of the surviving Winter Loppet ice sculptures

The snow storm started out above freezing, that meant the snow stuck to the trees. Usually it would fall off in a matter of hours but the temperatures dropped quickly freezing it in place

The snow storm started out above freezing, that meant the snow stuck to the trees. Usually it would fall off in a matter of hours but the temperatures dropped quickly freezing it in place

Aaron Shaffer of Weathernation TV was exploring the lakes on skis

Aaron Shaffer of Weathernation TV was exploring the lakes on skis

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Walking on Water: Visitiing the Frozen City Lakes of Minneapolis

Lake Serpent on Lake of the Isles

Lake Serpent on Lake of the Isles

It’s been a cool winter thus far, very cold. Not the coldest I’ve seen but the coldest in a while. There’s a lot of complaining going on but there are some definite advantages to this cold weather.  If you’re willing to bundle up and venture out into the latest Vortex you can find some unique winter experiences here in the cities.

 We try to make something out of our winters in MN; we have dog sled races and Winter Carnivals amongst other things. A couple weeks ago the Annual Winter Loppet took place in Minneapolis. This is a three day cross country ski event that takes place in the Uptown area, around the lakes, and in Theo Wirth Park.  One of the Loppet events is a “Luminary” evening that’s quite beautiful.  The Loppet Foundation builds a track around Lake of the Isles and Lake Calhoun. That trail is lined with ice installations and sculptures that are lit with candles on the night of the Luminary.  Participants can ski, walk, or snow shoe along the trails where bon fires, hot chocolate stations, and fire dancers await. On the night of the actual Luminary you have to pay in order to go out on the lake, but during winters like this one, the trails and sculptures survive for weeks afterwards and provide wonderful free and completely public opportunity for anyone who wants to venture out and explore one of our greatest urban assets.

The best thing about this weather is that it creates fantastic trail conditions. The cold temps and lack of fresh snow mean that the trails are very solid and compacted. It’s like walking on a sidewalk out there. That may not be ideal for cross country skiing but its great for the rest of us. You can easily walk, run, or bike all over the lakes and get a different perspective on one of our most beautiful public spaces.  I’d guess there’s about 7-10 miles of trails out there and there’s a lot to explore.

Warmer weather and or several inches of fresh snow will turn this into slush or obliterate the paths so jump out there while you can. Right now you don’t need skis or snow shoes. 

I’d like to thank my trusty canine companions Ole the Lab and Liffey the Boarder Collie for adding a little something to my photos. You can look at more photos from our expedition on my Paul’s Photography Facebook Page.

The Channel Leading from Lake of the Isles to Cedar Lake

The Channel Leading from Lake of the Isles to Cedar Lake

Cedar Lakes is the Wildest of the Lakes. There are a lot of woods surrounding it that you can explore

Cedar Lakes is the Wildest of the Lakes. There are a lot of woods surrounding it that you (and your dogs) can explore

 

The view of "Ice Henge" on the way from Cedar Lake to Lake of the Isles.

The view of “Ice Henge” on the way from Cedar Lake to Lake of the Isles.

The ice sculptures in the "Enchanted Forest" on Lake of the Isles have survived thus far because of the cold temps

The ice sculptures in the “Enchanted Forest” on Lake of the Isles have survived thus far because of the cold temps

The ice Pyramid on Lake of the Isles with downtown Minneapolis in the background

The ice Pyramid on Lake of the Isles with downtown Minneapolis in the background

The approach to Lake Calhoun from the lagoon between Calhoun and lake of the Isles.

The approach to Lake Calhoun from the lagoon between Calhoun and lake of the Isles.

In the lagoon again returning to Lake of the Isles from Calhoun. You can see the pyramid.

In the lagoon again returning to Lake of the Isles from Calhoun. You can see the pyramid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rape is a crime: What’s up with the Archdioceses and That List of Names?

abcYou’ve heard the one about “tangled webs?” Well the Catholic Church is twisting in a fine tangle these days. It turns out a lot of priests former and otherwise have a history of sexual liaisons (like those with children) were criminal in nature. This disgusting tapestry of sexual abuse has been unraveling for quite a while now but I’m not here to pull on another thread. My concern today centers around an observation that that has far as I know, has received little if any attention.

In an attempt to untangle the history of sexual abuse that has occurred within the church over the last several decades, several courts have now ordered that a number of archdioceses around the country must disclose the names of accused Priests. (The Strib has an article about this) The Church has of course resisted this, but not entirely for nefarious reasons

Many of the archdioceses have balked at full disclosure orders because they claim it will damage the reputation and careers of innocent Priests. Frankly, they have point. It is safe to assume that not all of the allegations over the last several decades were legitimate.

However I find that I cannot muster much in the way of sympathy for the Catholic Church or the affected priests. My reticence doesn’t merely stem from the fact that behind all of this lay a conspiracy of pedophiles. My concern is actually more mundane, I’m looking at decades of very basic criminal activity.

There is a reason that the Catholic Church and its priests find themselves in this situation, having to submit to what is admittedly a less-than-perfect solution. The origin of this dilemma lay in the decisions made decades ago that the church and its problems are somehow separate or beyond secular law. We don’t know which if any of these accused priests are actually guilty or innocent because these crimes have never been properly investigated. The problem is that church took it upon itself to investigate these alleged crimes.We know that you cannot trust that institutions will properly investigate themselves. Standard practice is to bring in outside investigators. In this case, we have well established, well trained, and publicly financed investigators who are available 24-7. We call them the “Police”.

We report crimes to the police, we don’t investigate them ourselves, and there are a lot of very good reasons for that. Rape is a crime. In fact rape, especially the rape of a child, is one of our most heinous crimes. I’m not saying that it would be easy for a Church official to make that phone call, but that’s what you do. These weren’t alleged “miracles” or “demonic possessions”, these were serious crimes. What was the church doing investigating crimes in the first place? Had these crimes been reported to the police years and decades ago they would have been properly investigated and these guys would have either been cleared or arrested. No private list would even exist because these names would already be a matter of public record. I can’t muster any sympathy for the church because the church built this house and it’s going to have to live in it. All we have left at this point are imperfect solutions. Obviously we can’t let the church decide whom amongst its accused priests are/were innocent. The names will have to be released and the chips will fall where they will.  

By the way, it’s not just the church that seems to have been confused about calling the police. Listen: if you, or your child, or wife, or anyone else is raped by a priest, you don’t report that to the church, you call the police. You can call the church if you want, TO TELL THEM THAT YOU JUST CALLED THE POLICE. Don’t report rape to an institution that’s going to investigate itself and expect things will work out. The fact that a crime occurs in a church doesn’t change the fact that it’s a crime. Call the police.       

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Back to Basics with Film: The “K” Series Orphan’s of Pentax

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbHEvery now than then I find myself thinking about camera designs. This may not be an unusual thing for a professional photographer to do but I like to share my thoughts on the blog here every so often. You can see a previous contemplation here.  

The other morning I decided it might be fun to dig out some of my old cameras and shoot some film for change. I have a bunch of film stored in my old dark room fridge along with the beer that has replaced the dark room paper and chemistry that used to occupy all that space.  I have many cameras to choose from in my collection. In addition to the Nikon F100 and FE that I used to shoot professionally I have Canon’s, Minolta’s, Olympus, Pentax’s and even a Praktica communist camera stored away.

Before I went digital I used to have a small bag complete with two Pentax bodies, lenses, light meter, and a flash.  I could just grab that bag and toss it in the car, or just keep it in the car so I’d be ready to shoot if the opportunity presented itself. It was nice to have a small ready-to-go bag on hand on a moment’s notice. It only seemed natural to turn to my trusty old ready-to-go bag for a morning of film photography.

SLR cameras have gone through three revolutionary eras in the last four decades. The first was a transition from mechanical architecture to electronic architecture between 1975 and 1985. The second was a transition from manual to automatic focus between 1985 and 1995. And the third was of course the transition to digital in the last decade or so.

These K’s hail from the 1st revolutionary era of SLRs. Pentax stayed with the all or mostly mechanical camera model longer than any of the other major manufacturers.  While the Nikons of that era are technically nicer cameras, these Pentax’s are fun to shoot for a variety of reasons. These cameras were known for their solid architecture and durable build. Pentax wasn’t big on bells and whistles, they produced practical cameras, mostly for serious amateurs and people who wanted better than point-and-shoots of the time.

Pentax K Series. K-100, KX, and K2

Pentax K Series. K-100, KX, and K2

The late 1970’s was a decisive age for camera manufacturers. In 1978 Canon introduced the A-1 and it was a game changer on a variety of levels, more than anyone realized at the time. Most of the core features you find on any DSLR today are derived from that A-1 design. I won’t go into great detail about the  A-1 here but the full multi-mode (i.e. full program, manual, shutter, and aperture priority modes all in one camera selected by a dial) features that you find on all DSLRs today was first introduced in the A-1. Likewise anytime you look through a view finder you will see LED’s providing all your information from shutter speed to frame count. That LED view finder was introduced in the A-1. It’s kind of funny actually, at the time one of the criticisms of the A-1 was a “cluttered” viewfinder with all that information. It seems silly now but at the time Canon took that concern so seriously that they actually built in a button to turn those LEDs off.

Canon A-1 Photo Wiki-Commons

Canon A-1 Photo Wiki-Commons

The A-1 was the first camera to be introduced as a complete “system” camera. Not only did Canon roll out a new “FD” lens assortment but there was a full range of accessories ranging from motor drives (souped-up auto-winders) to dedicated flashes that would automatically set your shutter speed and aperture. There was almost no gadget for a camera that anyone could want that wasn’t rolled out with the A-1 system. Olympus had a similar “system” for its OM series but in the end the A-1 ended up being more influential than any other camera.

While not actually marketed to professionals the A-1 greatly expanded a heretofore small consumer class, that would come to be called the “pro-sumer”. Nikon and Olympus had always marketed to serious photographers who weren’t professionals, but the A-1 knocked it out of the park. While the Olympus OM’s were probably the most elegant SLRs in history and the Nikons were sturdy and well-engineered, the A-1 was packed with features that no other camera had at the time. The A-1′s features were so attractive that a number of pros ended up using them (myself included) and the popularity of those features pretty much overwhelmed the market. By the mid-90s any manufacturer that wasn’t offering all those features on new designs was in serious trouble and many off them went under.

Here’s what’s interesting: at more or less the same time Canon was introducing its A-1, which was a radical departure for SLRs, Pentax was introducing its “K” series cameras that I’ve got in my ready-to-go bag. The “K” series is kind of weird because in many ways it’s an orphan series, with the exception of the ubiquitous K-1000 these cameras were discontinued within five or six years.

At the time Nikon and to a lesser extent Olympus and Canon had a lock the professional market. Pentax offered a pro camera, the LX, but not very many pro’s ever used them. Pentax wisely decided to focus on a different segment of the market. The K series cameras were designed for serious amateurs who wanted to take really nice photos but had no professional aspirations. While the A-1 was as electronic as a camera could possibly be at the time, these cameras provided as many features as they could in a mechanical camera. The A-1 required a hefty 6 volt battery to run practically everything but the K series got by on 1.5 to 3 volts that ran the light meter and very little else. In fact you could take the batteries out of mechanical cameras like these and still take pictures.  The A-1 is little more than an interesting paperweight without a battery.

Pentax Ks R-10

All of the K series cameras were introduced at the same time. The designs ran from the absolutely no-frills not even a self-timer K-1000 to the bells and whistle laden K2. These cameras are orphans because despite being really nice cameras, only the K-1000 was a really successful design. All of these cameras had sturdy and reliable designs but the k-1000’s lack of features makes it very simple to use which made it appealing to all kinds of photographers at all levels. The K-1000 also became an absolute favorite for introductory photography classes all over the world. One thing you want to teach aspiring photographers is that you don’t need fancy cameras to make incredible images and the k-1000 has taught that lesson to millions. Were it not for the switch to digital, the K-1000 would probably still be the camera of choice, Pentax manufactured it right up 1997 or 98.

The KX has a self-timer, mirror lock-up, and depth of field preview.

The KX has a self-timer, mirror lock-up, and depth of field preview.

The KX and K2 took the mechanical designs as far as they could go. Unlike the K-1000 they had fancy needle meters pointing to your shutter speed. The KX had an additional window that would reveal the aperture ring on your lens so you had both aperture and shutter speed info in your viewfinder. For some reason this feature is missing on the K2 which was supposed to be the more advanced camera.  The KX and K2 had other more advanced features like mirror lock-up buttons,* depth of field previews, and battery strength indicators.

The K-1000s basic basic needle light meter

The K-1000s basic basic needle light meter

The K2 has the more sophisticated needle match meter. Note the shutter speed of 8 seconds made possible by electronic assist.

The KX has the more sophisticated needle match meter.
The KX has a more sophisticated needle match meter as well as a window (not visible) revealing the aperture ring on the lens

The K2 has the more sophisticated needle match meter. Note the shutter speed of 8 seconds made possible by electronic assist.

The K2 had an aperture priority auto-mode and an exposure compensation dial. One weird feature of the K2, possibly inspired by the Olympus OM’s is an ASA dial that’s located around the lens mount. These take some getting used to and were not a popular feature. If you get one of these cameras today that dial will likely be very stiff or even impossible to move, but that is easily fixed.  

Pentax Ks R-6

You can see the program mode in the shutter dial of the K2

Pentax Ks R-7

The K2 notorious ASA ring located around the lens mount. These took some getting used to and tended to get stiff over time. They can be fixed however.

Pentax Ks R-8

You can see the mirror lock-up, self timer, depth of field preview, and exposure compensation dial.

Pentax Ks R-9

The K2 even has a fancy LED battery check.

These cameras are solid, reliable, and a pleasure to shoot. They had many of the same feature sets as the Nikon, Canon, and Olympus equivalents of the era (The FE, AE-1 program, and OM-1 or 2 respectively) but couldn’t quite reach the emerging pro-sumer’s consciousness because they all lacked auto-winder capability, and the mechanical shutters made long exposure cable release affairs. While you could get 8 seconds out of the K2 semi electronic shutter, you got 30 seconds from Pentax’s electronic shutter competitors.  The K-series price range at the time went from $75.00 for a K-1000 with a lens to $250.00 for a K2.  The Canon, Nikon, and Olympus equivalents were all  starting at around $300.

In many ways Pentax itself rendered the K series obsolete because at more or less the same time they released the K series they released the ME series. The ME’s were more electronic, compact, and could mount auto-winders. They had electronic shutters which gave them better dedicated flash capabilities as well. Whereas the K2 comes as close to a Nikon FE as a mechanical camera can get, the ME is downright comparable. You’re left wondering why Pentax bothered to release the K series at all?

me super wiki commons

The ME series had most of the same features as the Nikon FE and a sturdy build. The ME series, especially the ME super were probably Pentax’s most popular cameras besides the K-1000. They had a very strong and loyal following.

Its good thing Pentax did release the K’s because without them we never would have had the K-1000 and I wouldn’t have these sweet little cameras to play with today.

You can see some of the photos I took that day by visiting my Facebook page here:  https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.715282105156058.1073741842.670113279672941&type=3

*Mirror lock up eliminates the vibrations you can get if you’re shooting a long time exposure. You can lock up the mirror on a K-1000 if you know the little trick.                   

   

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Epilepsy vs. Race Baiting: Who’s Worse? Souhan or Lewis?

292px-Bele BW star trekThis is the tale of two toxic editorials published by the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Rather, this is the story of two toxic editorials that got two very different reactions.  One editorial by Joe Souhan  advocated the dismissal of a coach who suffers from epilepsy. The other by Jason Lewis was a blatant exercise in race baiting and fear mongering that maligned and entire ethnic minority. Guess which editorial provoked the outrage and protest amongst the good citizens of Minnesota?

When he wrote “In Category of Health, Kill Falls Too Short to Continue” Souhan ignored the basic tenets of human decency (Not to mention the basic tenets of grammar when writing a title) on behalf of a profoundly unbalanced set of priorities. Jerry Kill is the head coach for the MN Gophers football team. Last Saturday he had a seizure during a game to wit Souhan writes:

“No one who buys a ticket to TCF Bank Stadium should be rewarded with the sight of a middle-aged man writhing on the ground. This is not how you compete for sought-after players and entertainment dollars.”

Souhan’s disgust at the spectacle of an epileptic seizure is so powerful that he demands Kill’s resignation presumably so that someone with a less visible problem could take over. Souhan reminds us that the current environment of blowhards broadcasting toxic commentary was begun by the sports shock jocks of the mid-1980s. The only response I can muster for Mr. Souhan is a simple suggestion that he consider growing up and acting like an adult someday.  Beyond my response Souhan and the Strib got an earful. By the end of the day Souhan’s ill-mannered rant had provoked protest and condemnation throughout the land.  One of the better responses appeared on Minnpost. The protests and condemnations got so bad that the Strib ended up apologizing on Souhan’s behalf.  Souhan himself offered one of those non-apology (i.e. I’m sorry you read what I actually wrote instead of what I meant to say) apologies but it failed.

Where Souhan was boorish and immature Lewis was deliberate and calculating. The difference is Lewis got a complete pass.

Guys like Lewis like to pretend they work at an academic level but without the pretense, as if they’re intellectuals. In fact if Lewis were an actual academic he’d be an academic fraud.  His commentary:  Black on White Crime in America” is a perfect example of intellectual dishonesty and racism passing itself off as courageous journalism.

Lewis’s opening volley stretches all the way back to Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s ( Who was a Democrat by the way)  1965 claim that the “Negro” failure to establish nuclear families was at the heart of their economic woes. Moynihan’s genius was that he relied on Labor Department data to draw his conclusions. Moynihan’s failure was that he relied on Labor Department statistics.  If poverty in 1965 had been a simple matter of labor data he might have been onto something but as it turned out he merely launched decades of racial stereotyping that guys like Lewis have been relying on ever since. The truth is that for decades, contrary to Moynihan’s predictions, despite their lack of nuclear families, Black poverty dropped dramatically almost by almost 50%.

poverty by race historical

Charles Murray (The brain behind: “The Bell Curve”) picked up Moynihan’s idea (but very little in the way of reliable to data) and ran with it. In the early 70s Murray created the myth of the welfare queen and gave Jim Crow attitudes a new lease on life. 

Murray has long history of releasing big thick non-peer reviewed books that raise alarms about everything from education to “family” policy. The problem with not actually being an academic however is that despite education (Murray and Lewis both have advanced degrees) no one’s around to check your work. Consequently almost the entirety of every one of Murray’s arguments is based on an elementary statistical error. He constantly mistakes statistical correlation with causation.

This is what Moynihan got wrong back in 65. If you look at black families there are dozens of variables that describe black people and black families. Many of those variables will correlate with black poverty because so many black families live in poverty. The problem is that there are a multitude of factors that have nothing or little to do with “Blackness”. To make this simple it would be like asking: “Why were so many blacks slaves before the civil war?” and coming to the conclusion that it was because so many of them were descendants of Africans. Yes, you would find a really high correlation between African descent and slavery in pre-civil war America, and if that’s all you looked at you could conclude that Africans caused slavery in America, and like Murray, and Moynihan before him, you’d be wrong.  

40 years later Lewis is still peddling those myths and committing his own equivalent of academic fraud. Having attributed black poverty to a regurgitated, decades old, and long since discredited theory, Lewis takes up the issue of black crime. Lewis’s intellect is no more up to the task of analyzing crime data than poverty.  He concludes that blacks are targeting whites at an alarming rate.

This is flat out race baiting, and it’s completely false. Here’s what Lewis actually says:

“While most violent crime is indeed interracial, 26.7 percent of homicides where the victim is a stranger are interracial. And in 2008, the offending rate for blacks (24.7 offenders per 100,000) was seven times higher than the rate for whites (3.4 offenders per 100,000), according to the latest figures from the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS).

Accounting for population differences, whites are simply far more likely to be victims of interracial crime than blacks.”

I’m pretty sure I know where Lewis got his statistics, he mentions the latest figures from the Bureau of Justice and those are contained in a 2011 report, you can see that report for yourself here. This is the relevant passage:

Most murders were intra racial

 From 1980 through 2008–

 * 84% of white victims were killed by whites (Figure 19).

 * 93% of black victims were killed by blacks.

 Stranger homicides were more likely to cross racial lines than homicides involving friends or acquaintancesFor homicides committed by–

 * a stranger to the victim, 26.7% were interracial (Figure 20a)”

 

You can see Lewis’s 26.7% figure here, but just above that you can see the actual percentages of interracial homicides. If you do the math it works out to 16% for whites and 7% for blacks, that’s a difference of 9%. Sure you can say whites have twice the rate percentage of black interracial murder, but its 9%. Does that make whites “far” more likely to be a victim of interracial murder? In a word: “no”.

If Lewis wants to talk about “ likelihoods” then he needs to calculate rates and odds, not merely ignore actual percentages. To begin with the homicide rate for whites is 6 times lower than that for blacks so right out of the gate whites have lower odds of being murdered. The murder rate for whites is 3.3 per 100,000 and the murder rate for blacks is 19.6 per 100,000. We know 7% of those 19.6 murderers are not black and that works out to 1.3 non-black murderers per 100,000 blacks murdered. Meanwhile 16% of 3.3 works out to .53% or .53 non-white murderers of white people. That means even though a smaller percentage of blacks are murdered by non-blacks, a black person is still more than twice as likely to be a victim of interracial crime than a white person.

The other problem with Lewis’s information is that he seems to be assuming that blacks are the ones doing all those interracial murders of whites. In fact all we know is that those murders are not white, we can’t assume they’re all black.

If Lewis’s racism were limited to shoddy math and selective data picking we might be able to cut him some slack. The problem is Lewis doesn’t stop (or even begin) there. He lists several examples of heinous black on white crimes as if black criminals are more vicious than other criminals. In the end Lewis concludes that:

“ ‘gangsta culture’ is responsible for greater self-inflicted wounds among young African-American males than the remnants of racial bias”

Lewis is not referring to Italian gangsters.

Lewis is making a calculated attempt to provoke white fear of black Americans and he’s arguing that to the extent that black families have problems, they are self-inflicted. The information he uses to make this argument isn’t simply wrong, its dishonest, and as far as I can tell, its deliberate.  

So why did Souhan’s boorish article provoke so much more controversy than Lewis’s race baiting? You tell me. I merely note that unlike Souhan’s article in the sports section, Lewis’s article in the editorial page had the “comments” turned OFF.

Then there’s this; the reader might be interested to know that the phrase: “Blaming the victim” was actually coined by the psychologist William Ryan… in his response to the 1965 Moynihan Report.

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Do You Remember the Last War that was a Good Idea?

syria civil war

Photo Courtesy of AsiaNews 2012

The Syrian Civil War is a bloody horrible mess. Over two million people have been driven from their homes and over 100,000 people have been killed. Atrocities have been committed on both sides, although I don’t think the rebels have matched the atrocity of the government gas attacks.

So what are we to do? What are we to make of this?

Well, one lesson may be that the Syrian Civil War was a bad idea. Wars are frequently not good ideas. WW II didn’t go the way the Japanese and the Nazis thought it would. And our own Civil War seemed like a great idea at the time for the Southern states but turned out to be not so much. Granted sometimes wars kind of work out, like our own Revolutionary war. But most often war is not a good choice.

The Syrian rebels started this war. Instead of using non-violence and time to change the regime they decided to start a war, they gambled that violence would get them there sooner and/or easier than non-violence or the march of time. No dictator lives forever, and no family stays in power forever. Nevertheless the rebels thought war was a better alternative than the oppressions they were living with. Everything that’s happened subsequently flows out of THAT decision. That’s not an excuse for war crimes but it raises the distinct possibility that war was a bad idea.

I’m not a strict pacifist. I believe violence is sometimes justified. It’s not for me to decide whether or not the violence of the Syrian Civil War is justified, I merely point out that it was a choice, and it may have been a bad one.

I also point out that the Syrian Civil War was NOT my  choice, or my government’s choice. This is not an America’s war, and no logic dictates that contributing our military might and violence to that war will help anyone.

So maybe the war was a bad idea. Nothing the United States can do will change that. We can’t “fix” a war. As horrible and wrenching as this war may be, adding more violence to the mix doesn’t seem logical. For a fraction of the cost of a military attack we could offer expedited immigration status to Syrian refugees, or provide millions of dollars in support to the medical and refugee programs on the ground in surrounding nations.

I don’t know how things will work out in Syria but I find it strange that no one seems to considering the war itself as an actual factor in the conflict. The discussion thus far treats the war as if it’s mere background to some other problems like the chemical weapons or the refugees. Everyone is arguing about about messages and credibility and Obama’s speech or Putin’s NYTs article as if something other than war itself is the origin of the misery and human suffering. Talk about focusing on the trees instead of the forest.

An old soldier once said: “There never was good war or a bad peace”. That seems like such a simple observation, yet here we are again, in a bad war.

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Finding Racism in Zimmerman’s Acquital: You Don’t Have to Look That Hard

abcOn the evening of February 26, 2012 a neighborhood “watch” coordinator  by the name of George Zimmerman shot and killed a young black man by the name of Trayvon Martin in a gated community in Florida.  On July 13, 2013 a jury acquitted Zimmerman of all charges essentially declaring that he’d done nothing illegal.

The facts of this case are well known to most people. Zimmerman spotted Martin walking within the gated community and concluded that he was hooligan up to no good. He got out of his car and pursued Martin, they got into a fight, and Zimmerman used his gun to settle the matter.

There is no shortage of commentary or debate  regarding this case but I think one question stands out: What role if any did racism have in this tragic event?

There are actually two tragic events here, one is the killing of Trayvon Martin, and the other is the trial process that led to Zimmerman’s acquittal. I think racism was present in both tragedies, but it may surprise you to hear that I think it’s easier to confirm in the trial process.

There are two types of racism involved here, one is personal Zimmerman’s, the other institutional, the trial process.

Zimmerman’s racism is the more difficult of the two to confirm but I think it’s more likely than not that Zimmerman was making judgments about Trayvon based on racial profiling. We know that Trayvon was simply walking home from a convenience store and Zimmerman made an series of bogus assumptions. Zimmerman thought Trayvon looked like he was up to no good, maybe on drugs, and one of “those assholes” who always gets away, all wrong. While Zimmerman never actually says anything about the man’s race, all we have to do is ask ourselves whether or not Zimmerman would have made the same assumptions about a white man wearing a Polo shirt or a white woman in a jogging outfit? Trayvon was wearing a “hoodie” and it’s true that anyone can wear a hoodie, but we have to pretend that stereotypes don’t exist in order to conclude that Zimmerman was making no racial assumptions. Then we have to ask whether or not Zimmerman would have made the same bogus assumptions about a black man wearing a Polo shirt instead of a hoodie? We know that Zimmerman is a prejudiced observer. Despite the fact Trayvon was simply walking home Zimmerman describes him as suspicious: “wandering around looking about”. When Trayvon runs Zimmerman assumes this confirms his guilt and pursues him. We know racial profiling is a reality within law enforcement. However we have to assume it doesn’t exist in order to conclude that a wannabe cop acting as self-appointed security guard wasn’t profiling Trayvon.  We’ve had multiple cases all over the US of police officers profiling and killing unarmed black and Hispanic males. Ironically, if Zimmerman were actually a cop, we’d more likely to recognize his behavior as racial profiling.

While it’s true that we can’t “know” what Zimmerman was thinking, we can draw a strong inference. With the trial process we can actually know how and why the system produced the acquittal.  This actually makes it easier to confirm racism in the legal process.

Florida has a “Stand Your Ground” law that allows deadly force whenever and wherever a person thinks or “feels” like their life is in danger. However a catch 22 is built into the legal system.  In order to conclude one way or the other whether nor not Zimmerman thought  his life was in danger, he’d have to testify. The problem is we cannot compel the testimony of criminal defendants, Zimmerman never took the stand. This all but guarantees reasonable doubt in the trial process because no one else can testify as to what Zimmerman thought or felt. The law does not allow inference in this matter, we have to conclude beyond a reasonable doubt and that’s impossible without Zimmerman’s testimony. This is why so many legal observers keep saying the jury had no choice.

So where does the Racism come into view? The racism reveals itself when realize that we have a system that gives an obscure epistemological fact more weight than common sense. We have a system that makes an unknowable fact, Zimmerman’s state of mind, the deciding factor in Trayvon’s death. This is actually illogical, it guarantees a failure of justice.

Zimmerman is not a police officer, or even a rent-a-cop security guy. What business does he have pursuing “suspicious” people around the community in the first place? What was Zimmerman going to do, detain Trayvon until the cops got there? He had no authority to do that. Trayvon ran, and at one point lost Zimmerman yet somehow the two ended up in a fight. That could only happen one of two ways, either Zimmerman pursued and caught Trayvon, or Trayvon inexplicably turned around and decided to find and attack Zimmerman, according Zimmerman himself that’s not what happened. We know Zimmerman actually caught up to Trayvon after a pursuit. This means that  Zimmerman’s initial decision to observe and follow Trayvon led to the confrontation, yet that fact is considered to be legally irrelevant in this process. Why?

Here’s the thing: the only way we can as human beings ignore Zimmerman’s culpability is if we assume that Trayvon is responsible for his own death. How can Trayvon be responsible for his own death? Basically he refused to recognize Zimmerman’s authority and submit to it. THAT’S where the racism enters the equation. In fact Zimmerman had no legitimate authority whatsoever. He’s just another guy wandering around the neighborhood, he’s not a cop, nor is he security. It’s clear the jury in this case, and I know there were black women on the jury, made decisions based on Trayvon’s behavior, not Zimmerman’s. We have to ask why they did that?  

According to at least one juror Trayvon was partially responsible for his own death because instead reacting to Zimmerman as if he were a cop or security, Trayvon reacted to Zimmerman as if he was just another guy, possibly even an assailant. The problem with Trayvon is he acted like a white male instead of a black male.  Would we expect that a white male would submit to Zimmerman’s non-existent authority and do what? Present some kind of ID and explain why he was walking through his own neighborhood on the way to his own home? Would a white male be interrogated by Zimmerman or detained until the cops arrived? Presumably this is what Trayvon needed to do in order to save his life. The only survivable outcome here would have been for Trayvon to run into his house or submit to Zimmerman’s interrogation and detention.  The problem is for all Trayvon knew Zimmerman was a thug posing as some kind of neighborhood watch guy.  And remember, Trayvon is not required to retreat, he’s allowed to stand his ground as well.  We would not expect a white male to either run  away or submit to Zimmerman’s non-existent authority. Look, all that really happened here is Trayvon stood his ground, and he got killed for doing so. Zimmerman got off because black men aren’t supposed to run from danger or stand their ground, they’re supposed lie on the ground with their hands behind their heads.

The jury could have convicted Zimmerman of involuntary manslaughter. According to Florida Law: 

To establish involuntary manslaughter, the prosecutor must show that the defendant acted with “culpable negligence.” Florida statutes define culpable negligence as a disregard for human life while engaging in wanton or reckless behavior.  The state may be able to prove involuntary manslaughter by showing the defendant’s recklessness or lack of care when handling a dangerous instrument or weapon, or while engaging in a range of other activities that could lead to death if performed recklessly.” Findlaw.com

How is it NOT a dangerous and reckless activity for an armed man with no legal authority to pursue what he considers to be a dangerous criminal, by himself, through a residential area at night? Is a man carrying a gun NOT handling a dangerous instrument or weapon? A civilian with a gun chasing people through a neighborhood at night contrary to police advice is inherently dangerous and reckless with predictably BAD outcomes; yet this was not judged to be Culpable Negligence resulting in Manslaughter. Why?

This question was never raised because racist assumptions put Trayvon on Trial instead of Zimmerman and Florida’s legal process allowed it. Trayvon was standing outside his house, Zimmerman was practically in Trayvon’s back yard, yet it was Zimmerman who was standing his ground?  Trayvon’s behavior as a black man blinded the jury to Zimmerman’s behavior as a vigilante. What if Trayvon had been legally carrying a gun and shot Zimmerman out of fear for his life? Who would’ve gone on trial? What if Trayvon had been white and shot Zimmerman out of fear for his life? Would there have even been a trial? Trust your instincts, we know who would have been on trial in these different scenarios, and we know why.  That’s the second tragedy and it may be the bigger of the two  because it’s likely to be repeated and it tells us that racism is built into the system.        

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Rocking the Garden: The Lows and Highs of 89.3′s Music Festival

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

The summer of 2013 officially started last Saturday with my attendance at 89.3 FM’s (The Current) 11th annual “Rock the Garden”  (“annual” since 2002). This smallish music festival is held on the grounds of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis MN.  

It was a wonderful day.  My wife and I rode our bikes in on the Cedar Lake Trail from St. Louis Park.  A spur tail took us right to the Walker where organizers set up 500 spaces for bikes.  It’s a 15-25 minute ride depending on your speed and it’s free parking. We got a little wet on the way in, and a downright thunderstorm broke lose upon our arrival but it was fun, we had our raincoats.  Everyone, biker or not got soaked anyways and the organizers directed people into the parking garage which had been designated as a shelter.

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

 

We sat in the parking garage for about 20 minutes, after which strange things began to happen.  First a bunch of guys walked by carrying speakers. Then a flood of people started moving deeper into the garage. One glitch with this plan from an organizing perspective was that cell phone service and access to the festival’s free Wi-Fi and twitter feed were blocked by the garage. For this reason we had no idea why this flood of people was moving deeper into the garage.

Turns out Dan Deacon, the first act, had decided to start the show inside the garage instead on the stage in the thunderstorm (Go figure).  Deacon is a performance artist who drafts audience members into musical expressions wherein they dance or perform some other loosely directed activity. Deacon starts with a number of chosen performers who then lead subsequent audience members as they join the performance. Deacon’s “leaders” produced the best quote of the evening: “in this piece and in life in general, remember- if the leaders suck take over and do it yourself.” 

rock the gardenR-8

Performing for Dan Deacon. Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

It was hard to follow what was really going on due to the acoustics of the garage, and you couldn’t see anything unless you were right on top of it, but it was fun and turned into the most interesting exit/entrance to a music festival I’ve ever seen.  Deacon organized a human tunnel that grew and extended out of the garage back to the stage area where the rain had stopped, and sun was about to shine.

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

A word about food. They had quite a few food trucks there and beer and a vodka/lemonade drink. This stuff is always more expensive than it should be, $6 for a glass of Summit, $7 for a foot long Corn Dog etc.  However I must say they had really nice selection of stuff that was perfect for the occasion.

The 2nd act was Low. This has become something of a controversy because the act doesn’t appear to have been very popular.  They did a 27 minute long musical “drone” devoid of melody or rhythm. That was their entire set. I didn’t expect to like “Low” going into this. I’d listened to some of their stuff beforehand and wasn’t impressed but sometimes bands are more interesting live.

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Low. Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Listen: we rode in on Cedar Lake Trail which parallel’s a train track. On the way a train passed by.  I’m not kidding when I say I found the sound of that train more interesting than Low’s performance.  I’m 50 years old, I’ve listened to five minutes of Lou Reed’s “Metal Machine Music” LP.  This sounded like an idea had Syd Barrett had 50 years ago and walked away from. The notion of performers who are indifferent or even hostile to their audience is also decades old and not unfamiliar to me.  At the end of the set one band member shouted out: “Drone not Drones!” OK, so that was a drone attack on the audience. I get it, I’m just not impressed. My problem with Low is I think they’re boring. But here’s the thing, this is my personal reaction to this bands performance; However, I’m NOT complaining.

Hey this was 30 minutes of a 6 hour music festival, one of five acts. We sat there in the wet grass talking, listening, people watching, and soaking the much appreciated sunshine. There are worse ways to spend 30 minutes of your life. I’m not going to “complain” about this band’s performance, and neither should anyone else frankly. One thing it is critique, or react to art, but complain? Pfff.

Next the Bob Mould Band took the stage.

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Bob Mould Band. Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

I know I’ll be hung and dried for heresy for saying this but I think if you’ve heard three Bob Mould songs you’ve heard em all. Mould is great musician however, and his band is fantastic and super high energy.  After watching a few numbers we went off and ate some dinner. The Walker/Sculpture Garden area is a great place for a music festival. The sound at Rock the Garden was phenomenal. We could easily sit in the food area and listen to Bob Mould while eating. In front of the stage you weren’t blown away by reverb or echoes, you could hear the music and see the bands, it was nice.

Silversun Pickups and Metric finished off the evening.

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Silversun Pickups. Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

When the Pickups took the stage we settled into the audience for the duration and were not disappointed. I’m not a huge fan of either of these groups but they’re good bands and they were fun to watch. Metric really surprised me because going into the concerts Silversun Pickups was my favorite.  All of the acts with the exception of Low put out fun and energetic performances. In fairness, I don’t think Low was interested in being watched so s’all good on that account.

The concerts took place with the Minneapolis skyline in the background and as the sun set on Metric’s performance the stage faded to black and it was time to ride home.

Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

Metric. Photography by Paul Udstrand. All Photos Copyrighted Paul Udstrand 2013

It was a beautiful cloudless night with a three quarter moon shining bright in the sky. Along the way we passed some areas of cool and fairly dense ground fog that glowed in the moonlight. If you ever have a chance to take a bike ride like that I strongly recommend it. Gliding along silently through moonlit fog on a cool night under a bright moon should definitely be on your bucket list of things to do.

Tickets for Rock the Garden cost $60 (including the “sales fee”). That works out to ten bucks an hour for five live bands, four of which are nationally and internationally recognized acts… in other words decent bands. This year looks like it was the strongest year ever in terms of performances judging by past line-ups (although OK Go would have been fun back in 1010). This was our first year, and depending on the line up we’ll go again. For ten bucks an hour, it’s well worth it. You can always sneak in a sandwich and drink water if you don’t want to pay too much for the food.  

    

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Minnesota Celebrates the Freedom to get Married

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

On May 14th 2013 love became the law in  Minnesota. At 5:00 Governor Mark Dayton signed the marriage equity  law establishing marriage rights for gays and lesbians. Thousands attended the signing on the Capital steps and then marched in a parade to the Ecolab Plaza in Downtown St. Paul.  Dubbed the: “Love is the Law Concert” thousands of people celebrated as several bands (including members of the Suburbs performing their 1984 hit single “Love is the Law” ) played until 10:30. 

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013     Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013 

The parade was lead by the Minnesota Freedom Band, an all gay/lesbian marching band.

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013     Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013 

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013
Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Hookers n Blow started off the Concert.

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013
Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

 

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Love was celebrated all over the Twin Cities. The Minnesota Department of Transportation lit up the 35W bridge (which has mulit-color programmable LED lights built into it) as big rainbow. Thousands stopped by to view and photograph the bridge throughout the evening. 

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand  Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photograph by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

 

 

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Equality Wins the Day in Minnesota: Freedom to Marry Becomes Law!

Photo by Paul Udstrand copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

A little over fifteen years ago I changed careers and became a photographer. Amongst other things I photograph weddings. I like to photograph weddings because they involve several different types of photography, formal portraits, journalism, candid’s, still life, low light, etc. Of course the other great thing about weddings is the fact that they are joyous occasions with mostly happy people and that always makes for great photos.

About two years into my new profession I got a call from man who wanted to know whether or not I photographed “Commitments”. Now my previous career had been in psychology and the only commitment I was familiar with was the one where people were involuntarily sent to state hospitals. I couldn’t imagine someone wanted photos of that so pressed for an explanation. The man explained that he and his partner were having a commitment ceremony to which I replied: “Oh, you’re getting married.” I was still confused because I didn’t understand why he wasn’t calling it a wedding. I kept calling it a wedding and he kept correcting me. I assumed (wrongly) that this was a cultural decision amongst the GLBT community, a decision to call their marriages something other than weddings.

Photo by Paul Udsrand  Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Now I know this will sound cliché but I knew and had known many gay and lesbian people and couples. I have gay/lesbian friends and coworkers so it’s not that I was completely ignorant regarding gay people, I just assumed there were some aspects of the GLBT community that I wasn’t aware of. The ceremony was going to take place in a church and that seemed perfectly natural to me… that’s usually where people get married. Finally  with some exasperation my new client explained: “No, you don’t understand, it’s illegal for us to get married, we CAN’T call it a wedding or a marriage.” I was stunned. It never occurred to me in a million years that the law would actually prohibit GLBT marriages. Why in the world would my government give a rats ass whether or not two men or two women wanted to get married and make a life together? What possible interest could any legislator have in regulating GLBT relationships?

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Now you have to remember I’m an atheist so I’m out of the loop on any religious objections people might have. Furthermore I assumed that whatever religious objections anyone might have would be moot because our Constitution separates church from state, we’re not supposed to have laws based on religious beliefs alone. Marriage for gay people seems as natural to me as anyone else’s marriage; it’s the final step in a relationship. What possible interest could the State have in interfering with relationships amongst consenting adults? There is no legitimate explanation.  

This story doesn’t embarrass me. I’m not ashamed to admit that I assumed we treat people with equality. I’m a little ashamed to admit that I have friends who were being denied civil rights unbeknownst to me. I was definitely ashamed of my government and my community. Not anymore.

Yesterday all that nonsense was erased from MN law. Today Governor Dayton will sign a law granting gays and lesbians the same rights to marry and have weddings as everyone else. I spent the day photographing people as they waited for this historic vote in the MN Senate. It was an amazing and joyous day and victory for freedom, civil rights, and dare I say… love.

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

I know there are some people who are troubled by this vote, and there are those who opposed it. Time will prove whatever fears people have had are unfounded, and that equality is always a better path than oppression and bigotry. A great thing happened yesterday, I know that eventually almost everyone will accept and maybe even celebrate the day Minnesota recognized the power of love, and the rights of our gay and lesbian friends and families.        

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udsrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand
Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

 

GMdayR-37

Photo by Paul Udstrand. Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

The Mayor of St. Paul MN declared that the entire of week of May 13th is “Freedom to Marry Week”. Volunteers placed rainbow flags on the Wabasha Street Bridge across the Mississippi river.

 

 

 

 

Photo by Paul Udstrand Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

Photo by Paul Udstrand. Copyright Paul Udstrand 2013

 

 

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